Saturday, January 27, 12:30 pm, The Venue

Indigenous, Impressive, Intimate: A Panel Discussion on Relationships Revitalized

Indigenous, Impressive, Intimate: A Panel Discussion on Relationships Revitalized

  • Saturday, January 27, 12:30 pm, The Venue

Sponsored by:  Community Foundation of Greater Peterborough,  Community Foundations of Canada

Indigenous, Impressive, Intimate:

A Panel Discussion on Relationships Revitalized

Personal and poetic documentary stories shed light on bigger pictures. This panel focuses on people of the Kanyen’keha:ka, Michi Saagiig Anishinaabe, and Secwepemc. The directors and subjects explore the experiences of people who are rekindling relationships and reconnecting with language, the land, and cultural healing.  The camera takes us inside these intimate stories, revealing the challenges, courage and beauty behind thrown-around terms like ‘reconciliation’ and ‘revitalization.’

This year’s festival is honoured to have three directors to speak with us about their stories: Nikki Auten (Restoring Rotinonhsyon:ni: Nikki’s Kanyen’keha Journey), Cara Mumford, (The Oldest Tree in the World),  and Sean Stiller (Kéwku).

The panel will pose questions such as: How do you sensitively and respectfully film Indigenous stories? How are intimate personal stories part of the political movement to value the beliefs and cultures of the Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island?

Moderated by Marrie Mumford, who formerly held the Canada Research Chair for Aboriginal Arts and Literature, and was the First Artistic Director of NOZHEM: First Peoples Performance Space at Trent.

Bios

CARA MUMFORD (Métis / Chippewa Cree) is a filmmaker, writer and collaborative artist from Alberta, who has lived in Peterborough, Ontario since 2010.  Cara’s short films have screened regularly at the imagineNATIVE Film & Media Arts Festival in Toronto, and toured Internationally, including Australia. Cara regards film as visual poetry and has been equally inspired by the mythopoetic work of Maya Deren, the creative challenges of Dogme 95, and the culturally specific storytelling of Zacharias Kunuk. Her short film The Oldest Tree in the World is being screened at this year’s ReFrame .

SEAN STILLER is an award-winning Canadian-Secwepemc filmmaker and cinematographer, whose work includes documentary, commercial, and First Nations films. He holds an MFA in Documentary Media from Ryerson University. His film Cyéwmen, is an immersive installation of the traditional Secwepemc (Shuswap) salmon fish camp. He is completing a documentary film exploring the crises of Secwepemctsín language loss and the transformative potential for Indigenous language revival. His films have screened throughout Canada, the United States and New Zealand. His short film, Kéwku is being screened at this year’s ReFrame .

TAYOHERSON:TYE (NIKKI AUTEN) is a Kanyen’keha:ka (Mohawk) from Tyendinaga, born into the Turtle Clan. She teaches Kanyen’keha (Mohawk language), and is currently a student in Trent’s Master of Arts in Sustainability Studies program, where she is exploring how Indigenous language programs can aid in the resurgence of Kanyen’keha speakers in Kanyen’keha:ka communities.  She works with youth in Nogojiwanong, and in her home community, as well as being involved with the Flint Corn Community Project, the Ratinenhayenthos Seed Sanctuary, and the Learning Centre in Tyendinaga.  Her short film, Restoring Rotinonhsyon:ni: Nikki’s Kanyen’keha Journey is being screened at this year’s ReFrame .